Beware of insolvency-related scam

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A recent scam attempt came to our attention that we thought businesses and individuals should be aware of.

Malcolm Rhodes explains.

We received a telephone call from a creditor on a liquidation closed last year. The caller said he was following up what he thought had been a call from us a couple of weeks ago.

In that call he was advised that a cheque for £36 we’d sent him hadn’t been cashed, and could he provide his bank account details so that he could be paid direct? The individual declined to provide his bank details and instead requested a replacement cheque. He was phoning us to chase that up.

We confirmed that we hadn’t paid a dividend to any class of creditor in the case concerned, and we were able to establish that we had had no other dealings with this creditor that would have necessitated any payment being made to him.

The creditor hadn’t noted the name or number of the caller and, on reflection, noted that the caller hadn’t disclosed he was from Bishop Fleming, though he had used the case name and the creditor assumed he was from the firm.

The creditor just happens to be the first one on the list attached to the statement of affairs, which is the Statutory form filed at Companies House and therefore publicly available information.

It may be that the call was a one off, and it was not as sophisticated a scam as we might otherwise see, but one to be wary of perhaps.

Other scams

The Insolvency Service recently highlighted that people had been receiving emails with the subject line of “Company Investigations Inquiry Notice“. The Insolvency Service recommends deleting such emails, and not to click on any links contained in the message.

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